Genetics make up about 50% of the risk for alcohol dependence, but they by no means tell the whole story. Genetic history is often hard to distinguish, but if parents are regular heavy drinkers, or they drink to reduce stress and depression, it is likely that their children will grow up believing that these behaviours are normal and possibly harmless. But environmental influence doesn’t come only from the home; peer pressure from friends, colleagues and partners can also encourage new and difficult patterns of drinking which can lead to dependency or co-dependency.

For others, dependency comes after a prolonged period of difficulty in their life. Drinking might appear to be a good method of coping in these situations, and sufferers will often start as a ‘stop-gap’, just to tide them over until conditions improve. Nevertheless, as drinking begins to impact relationships and responsibilities, and hangovers exacerbate the very stress the drinking sought to avoid, the difficulties can increase, encouraging yet more drinking and leading to a vicious cycle.
Persistence in drinking, even when daily life is being negatively impacted by the effect of the alcohol dependence, is one of the biggest signs of abuse. A person who is addicted to drinking simply cannot stop drinking, even as the evidence of the harm they are doing to themselves and the world around them mounts. Alcohol offers an escape from their responsibilities and realities, and this is preferable to confronting the truth of the destructiveness of their addiction. Similarly, resisting pleas, requests, and demands to stop drinking is a surefire sign of abuse.

We understand that alcoholism is a destructive illness. We know full well that the cycle of alcohol addiction can be hard to break. So we offer a range of effective treatments and programmes created for each individual and designed to treat the mind, body, and spirit as a whole. This person-centred approach helps patients get to the root of their addictive behaviours and eventually overcome their illness.
Alongside our psychotherapy, we offer more varied alternative therapies that help reinforce the clinical alcohol rehab treatments. This keeps the days spent with us at Searidge Alcohol Rehab both interesting and rewarding. Our program includes mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, yoga, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy, Tai Chi and First Nations Healing Rituals.
Whether you’re struggling with an addiction to prescription drugs, street drugs, marijuana, or other substances, we’re here to help. At The Recovery Village, we offer specialized treatment services to support you through the rehabilitation process, from detox to therapy, discharge planning, and aftercare. Call our intake counselors at any time for information about our recovery services.
The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village. Step 1 of the 12 Steps for Recovery from Addiction | Guided Meditation

Searidge Drug Rehab is located in the famously picturesque Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia overlooking the Annapolis Basin and just minutes from the seacoast. Throughout the year the lush scenery reflects the healing cycle of nature’s seasons in all their beauty. The serenity of being surrounded by nature on an extensive acreage helps to heal the mind, the body, and the spirit.
Drugs are built to interfere with those messages, causing the release of too many neurotransmitters for the wrong behavior—taking drugs. This causes a huge spike in pleasure for a destructive activity that eclipses normally pleasant activities needed for survival. Drug use also prevents normal reuptake of these brain chemicals, throwing off the entire process and your natural balance, altering your mood. Soon, all that matters is to produce that flood of neurotransmitters again—and due to the addiction, there’s just one way to do that: drug use.
Nicole Lee works as a paid consultant in the alcohol and other drug sector. She has previously been awarded grants by state and federal governments, NHMRC and other public funding bodies for alcohol and other drug research. She is a member and past President of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy. She is a registered Psychologist who has previously worked in private practice.

On this site, you can get the answers that you need in order to make the most informed decisions for yourself or your loved one. From understanding basic facts about specific substances to identifying the program that best meets your unique needs, your path out of the darkness of addiction and into the bright promise of a healthier tomorrow can start here. Drug rehab facility | Best Drug Rehabilitation | Best drug rehab centers
Drugs affect the way a person thinks, feels, behaves and how they look. But substance use disorders are often accompanied by co-occuring mental health disorders like anxiety or depression. Some people may use drugs as a form of self-medication for these issues, while other people may develop a mental health disorder after taking substances. Either way, it’s important to look out for psychological and behavioral changes in friends or loved ones who might be struggling with addiction:
Stress, anger, frustration, self-esteem issues, depression, anxiety, trauma – all of these and more can be overwhelming to a person, driving them to seek relief of any kind from any source. Without positive coping skills to help handle issues, many turn to drugs and alcohol and, with repeated use, they spiral out of control into psychological and physical dependence. Cure Alcoholism Best Advice -- How to Treat Alcohol Addiction By David Smallwood

Drug detox: Detox, short for detoxification, is the first phase in many substance abuse treatment programs. During detox, patients are monitored by professionals during their withdrawal from drugs. Medications, nutritional supplementation and fluid replacement may be provided to relieve withdrawal symptoms. At the same time, counseling is provided to encourage the patient to move forward to the next phase of rehabilitation.
We respect that your time and energy is limited. You want to make up for lost time with your friends and family, and commit yourself to your responsibilities. You are more than your past addiction, and while it is important to maintain strong bonds with the recovery community, it should no longer take up your whole life. Searidge’s aftercare program offers a variety of options that will work with your specific daily responsibilities and needs. Drug Rehab Houston | What's Drug Rehab Like? | Drug Rehabilitation Centers Near Me
Most patients will want to exit treatment as soon as possible, however, that is not always the best course of action. Treatment programs can vary greatly in terms of length, and the length of stay should be determined on a case-by-case basis as per the readiness of the patient to manage sobriety in addition to the responsibilities of life at home and/or at work. We offer 30-day, 60-day, and 90-day program options and can help you determine which will be most appropriate for your addicted loved one based on his or her needs in treatment.
It is important that you know how to act when triggers or cravings present themselves. If you have a plan in place, it can help to prevent a full-blown relapse. It may be that you will get in touch with your counsellor or sponsor, or perhaps distraction will help. You might find that going for a walk or doing something else to keep you busy can help the cravings subside.
Thanks to years of research, doctors and health professionals now have a full menu of options to treat alcohol use disorders. Building on this progress, scientists continue to work on new medications and discover new ways to improve the effectiveness, accessibility, quality, and cost-­effectiveness of treatment for people who have alcohol use disorders.
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8] 12 Steps of AA with Father Martin YouTube WMV V8
Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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