The patient's response determines the physician's next step. If the patient denies the problem, recommending joining AA will not work. Involving the family and/or suggesting a trial of abstinence is useful, and, importantly, the physician should follow up with the patient in a few weeks. The patient might be angry initially and storm out of the office, but then the patient might recall the physician's warning months or years later and stop drinking. For patients who recognize a problem and will consider referral, the cheapest (free) and most accessible option is AA.
Addiction comes in many forms and is largely found to involve more than one substance or condition. One of the more common coexisting substance combinations is alcohol and drug addiction. According to The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, more than 23 million people over the age of 12 are faced with an addiction to both alcohol and drugs. Many substance abuse treatment centers address both substances. The individualized programs at The Recovery Village focus on treating addiction to drugs, alcohol, or both, in addition to co-occurring mental disorders.
Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
×