Frequent meetings with an alcohol counselor are important for individuals to communicate and receive guidance during their recovery. Counseling opens a line of communication during the good times, as well as the difficult times. Your therapist will also be able to work with you on any underlying issues that may be triggering your drinking problem such as peers, family relationships, work or other circumstances. This will give you an opportunity to learn more about yourself, as well as how to keep your body healthy both inside and out.
Group, individual, and can help to address the root causes of addiction and build communication and life skills that are necessary to live a sober life. Group therapy and family therapy provide a means to talk openly and honestly about your addiction and gain support from other in recovery, parents, siblings and adult children. One-on-one talk therapy provides the opportunity to more deeply explore underlying issues and trauma in a private setting.
If you or a loved one is suffering from drug addiction, you may be looking for help curing the disease. One of the most well-known methods is drug rehab. However, many people don’t realize that “drug rehab” is a broad-encompassing term that represents various treatment methods. The type of drug rehab that you choose could depend on an array of factors. Making the Decision to Get Help - Alcohol Rehab Review
The action stage of change represents full recognition of a problem along with observable evidence of steps taken to reduce alcohol use. The clinician should reinforce and praise the decision to change. Emphasizing that the biggest error at this stage is to underestimate the amount of help needed to quit drinking is critical. The patient should be given a list of options for treatment including AA and pharmacotherapy. Eminem on drugs, addiction and rehab
The National Institute on Drug Abuse states, “Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” Addiction can result from a variety of factors and catalysts, including genetic predisposition, circumstances, environment, trauma and mental health disorders. While addiction often starts with drug abuse, it is not an indication of a person’s moral status or stability. In fact, many addictions spring from prescription drug use or casual use of legal substances.
It can be heartbreaking to realize that your loved one has a problem with alcohol. You want to do anything you can to help — but you’re afraid that if you speak up, you could destroy your relationship, or even drive your loved one deeper into addiction. At first, it’s much easier to deny the problem. But as time goes on and personal, financial, or legal problems increase, you’ll have to face the possibility that your loved one could have a substance use disorder. Learning to recognize the red flags of alcoholism could not only save your relationship, it could help you avoid a tragedy.

3. The meat of the program (psychotherapy and behavioral treatments) – This is one of the most important phases of rehabilitation, as it begins to give you a base for future sobriety. During this phase, you work with an alcohol counselor to address your current mental and emotional condition and understand where it’s coming from.  Then, you can start to make behavioral and attitudinal changes to remain sober, prevent relapse, and start living a happy life. If you are dedicated – the chances for your alcohol rehab program to work are increases and you have made significant steps towards becoming sober long-term.

This internationally recognized nonprofit foundation has treatment centers in Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania. The Caron Foundation began when its founder, Richard Caron, used his home as a retreat for those in recovery. Eventually, he purchased a hotel on a farm in Pennsylvania and opened what is now one of the most successful treatment centers in the nation. The Caron Foundation uses a comprehensive approach to treatment and works with top university medical centers to further the efficacy of certain treatment methods. Caron centers its program on the 12-step method, but also has a unique relapse program.
The cost of inpatient rehab programs depends on the treatment center selected, the level of clinical care recommended, and the length of time in treatment. The amount you pay will also depend on whether you’re able to access insurance benefits to help cover the cost or you’re paying out-of-pocket. Hazelden Betty Ford is in-network with most insurance carriers, and most of our patients use their health insurance benefits to help cover treatment costs. Insurance policies and benefits vary greatly, so it's important to check with your provider about coverage specifics in your case. As a nonprofit treatment center, Hazelden Betty Ford offers patient financial assistance funds as available, on a limited basis, to help offset the cost of addiction treatment for qualifying patients.
After the physical detoxification process, the next stage of alcohol treatment involves treating the mental health of the patient with counseling and therapy. A psychologist or psychotherapist will work closely with the patient to help identify the reasons that the patient turned to problem drinking. Once these reasons are understood, the next stage is to apply the understanding to the future, giving the patient the tools they need to make better choices and decisions. Part of the treatment process is to break associations with the people and environments that encouraged the patient to drink past healthy levels. Since alcohol is so prevalent in society and even everyday life, treatment will also involve learning how to resist the temptation to drink in socially acceptable situations, and how to deal with the thoughts and memories of the pleasure derived from drinking.
Whether or not you can successfully cut back on your drinking depends on the severity of your drinking problem. If you’re an alcoholic—which, by definition, means you aren’t able to control your drinking—it’s best to try to stop drinking entirely. But if you’re not ready to take that step, or if you don’t have an alcohol abuse problem but want to cut back for personal or health reasons, the following tips can help:
However, other elements – for example the type of therapies available – may lie completely beyond your understanding and experience. With this in mind, it is always advisable to speak with an addiction specialist who will almost certainly be able to think of things which may not occur to you but which could be very important. By leveraging the vast experience of an addiction specialist you can be sure that issues of great importance will not go unaddressed.

Each customised drug addiction treatment program is guided by an individual treatment plan that addresses co-occurring psychological or psychiatric disorders. Most common mental health issues such as ADD/ADHD, bipolar disorder, PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), anxiety disorders, and depression are often the cause of self-medication that leads to drug addiction and alcoholism. It would not make sense to treat only the addictive behaviour without addressing the psychological problems causing the drug addiction.
Alcohol addiction treatment at Priory is delivered as part of a comprehensive Addiction Treatment Programme. Our Addiction Treatment Programmes typically last for 28 days, and consist of you staying at one of our nationwide hospital sites on a residential basis, for the duration of this time. During treatment, you will have the opportunity to undergo a medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process if this is required, before undergoing intensive individual and group addiction therapy in order to address the source of your addictive behaviours, increase your self-awareness and take steps towards recovery. Whilst 28 days is the recommended treatment time for alcohol addiction, treatment lengths at Priory can be flexible according to your unique needs, requirements and commitments. How to Quit Drugs Without Rehab - Are Drug Addiction Rehab Facilities Even Effective Long Term?
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