When a person receives a diagnosis of alcoholism, the next important step is getting that person to appropriate alcoholism treatment. Unfortunately, there is a variety of reasons alcoholics are reluctant to seek treatment including, the belief that therapy will not work, fear of being stereotyped and complete denial they have a problem at all. The first thing alcoholic individuals and their loved ones should understand is that alcoholism is a disease. In addition, just as some diseases cause pain, alcoholism produces responses such as fear of withdrawal and severe cravings. It is also good for alcoholics to understand that treatment can be challenging but that it is all worth it to achieve a successful recovery. Intervention by a loved one is usually a turning point for alcoholic individuals, often providing them with the motivation to seek the help they need. While it is important an alcoholic's loved ones express their support, they will also need to be firm in their insistence that the person seeks treatment.

Don't let financial constraints stop you from living a life free of alcoholism. Regardless of whether you don't have insurance, your insurance benefits ran out, or your insurance refuses to cover your alcohol dependency treatment, you can get treatment. Free alcohol rehabilitation is available if you really want it. By admitting you have a problem and need help you have already completed the first and most important step of pursuing a life of sobriety.
If faith-based rehabilitation and professional rehab clinics are not viable options for you, look into state funded free alcohol addiction treatment. These programs are entirely funded by tax dollars and vary from one state to another. Some offer long-term treatment including residential care, while others offer only short-term treatment consisting primarily of detoxification. You won't know what your state can offer you until you ask. It may just be your ticket to sobriety.

It can be heartbreaking to realize that your loved one has a problem with alcohol. You want to do anything you can to help — but you’re afraid that if you speak up, you could destroy your relationship, or even drive your loved one deeper into addiction. At first, it’s much easier to deny the problem. But as time goes on and personal, financial, or legal problems increase, you’ll have to face the possibility that your loved one could have a substance use disorder. Learning to recognize the red flags of alcoholism could not only save your relationship, it could help you avoid a tragedy.
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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