The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible.
Ideally, health professionals would be able to identify which alcoholism treatment is most effective for each person. NIAAA and other organizations are conducting research to identify genes and other factors that can predict how well someone will respond to a particular treatment. These advances could optimize how treatment decisions are made in the future.
Over time, most users need more and more of the same drug simply to achieve the same effects they experienced when consuming a lower dosage less frequently. Eventually, the user must have the drug simply to function and avoid feeling sick or terrible; this is one of the hallmarks of addiction. Stopping use of the drug often causes intense cravings, which is another symptom of withdrawal and addiction.
Individual therapy will help you learn to recognize triggers and cope with them. The therapists may also help you to improve your emotional regulation skills in order to better avoid relapse. Group counseling provides you with the opportunity to practice sober social skills, as well as the coping strategies you learned in individual counseling. Family therapy sessions can help to repair broken relationships, improve communication skills, and build conflict resolution skills. Medication, such as methadone or Suboxone, may be used in combination with behavioral therapy to help opioid-addicted individuals remain abstinent. Once your rehab program nears an end, your treatment team will create an aftercare or relapse prevention plan for you consisting of ongoing support. Ongoing support may include individual therapy, group counseling, self-help group meetings (e.g., 12-step, SMART Recovery), alumni programs, or sober living homes.1,2
Historically, drug addiction and those suffering with it were maligned as morally weak people who made bad choices. This pure behavioral model, however, fails to account for the biological changes that addiction triggers in the body and brain. Furthermore, it overlooks the issue of comorbidity; many people who are addicted to drugs also suffer from mental health problems and use drugs to self-medicate for those problems.

While a trial period of controlled drinking with careful follow-up might be appropriate for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse, this approach increases a physician's professional liability. Complete abstinence is the only treatment for alcohol dependence. Emphasize that the most common error is underestimating the amount of help that will be needed to stop drinking. The differential diagnosis between alcohol abuse and dependence can be a difficult judgment call.
In a survey of treatment providers from three separate institutions (the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors, Rational Recovery Systems and the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors)[where?] measuring the treatment provider's responses on the Spiritual Belief Scale (a scale measuring belief in the four spiritual characteristics AA identified by Ernest Kurtz); the scores were found to explain 41% of the variance in the treatment provider's responses on the Addiction Belief Scale (a scale measuring adherence to the disease model or the free-will model addiction).[4]

Drug abuse statistics can be alarming, but the numbers also show a potential for help and healing. The Substance Abuse and MEntal Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) National Survey on Substance Abuse and Health states that while 21 million Americans aged 12 and over needed drug or alcohol treatment in 2016, only 3.8 million received the help they needed at a specialized treatment facility. Other research sources on drug addiction show that:
Drug addiction causes sufferers to experience physical and psychological dependency on illicit, mind-altering substances. Habitual drug use causes changes in the structure and operation of the brain that deepen and reinforce drug addiction, to the point where a desire to stop using drugs is not enough to make it happen. Drug addiction is a destroyer of hopes, dreams, and lives, but with inpatient treatment plus a comprehensive aftercare program drug addicts can find lasting relief from the ravages of chemical dependency, regardless of how long they’ve been addicted.
Die Suchtselbsthilfegruppen ergänzen seit mehr als 40 Jahren im Deutschen Roten Kreuz (DRK) das professionelle Suchthilfeangebot. Die Betroffenen finden dort aus eigener Kraft zu einem Leben in zufriedener Abstinenz und stärken gegenseitig ihre Ressourcen. Die Gruppenmitglieder arbeiten teilweise anonym und fangen Hilfesuchende in schwierigen Situationen unterschiedslos auf.
This quote might best sum up the topic of proclivity for acquiring a drug addiction: “Most people who become addicts are subject to a combination of risk factors.” Anything from childhood trauma and having alcoholic parents to being exposed to drugs at an early age can influence whether a person takes their first hit or their first drink. And whether addiction will develop.5
As it gradually unfolds, drug addiction causes structural changes in the brain that distort thinking and perception, specifically in areas related to behavioral control, judgment, decision-making, learning, and memory. Drug addicts suffer enormously negative life consequences as a result of their compulsive and uncontrolled drug use, but that doesn’t prevent them from returning to drugs again and again.

NIDA recommends that any type of drug addiction treatment last at least 90 days; in fact, they find that shorter treatment lengths demonstrate limited effectiveness.11 Studies have demonstrated that the people who stay for 3 months or longer typically have better outcomes.12 So, while the initial investment of time can seem daunting, longer treatment lengths pay off.


The specific details and content of aftercare will vary from one facility to the next, but typically it comprises a participation in various therapy sessions on site, alongside phone sessions if and when required. The rehab will give you a bespoke recovery plan to take with you once you leave the facility which will include these aftercare sessions as well as recommendations for attendance at fellowship groups.
You should also speak with an addiction specialist who can give you a wider-range view of treatment options both in your area and further away (some people choose to place quite some distance between their recovery and the environment in which they have been abusing drugs), and who will be able to give you the benefit of more specialised experience and insight than your GP. Step 1 of the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous ★★★★★

At the end of an intervention, the stage is set for entry into addiction treatment programs. There are many different options out there. Some facilities, for example, offer inpatient treatment for addiction. These programs allow people to step away from their day-to-day concerns and tackle an addiction around the clock, every single day. For some people, that tight focus is an ideal setup for healing. But outpatient centers can be ideal for those who want to stay at home, surrounded by family, while they work on addictions to alcohol. It’s a personal decision that families can make in consultation with the person who needs help.


When you choose a complete alcohol rehab programme, you are choosing to be treated holistically. That is, you are choosing to address your alcohol problem physically, mentally, and spiritually. We firmly believe this is the best way to go. Treating the whole person constitutes a comprehensive treatment. Treating just one aspect is equal to treating just one part of the problem.
Insurance: Many types of insurance cover the cost of addiction treatment and rehab; in particular, the Affordable Care Act requires that insurance policies issued under the state health exchanges and through Medicaid programs under the ACA expansion must provide coverage for addiction treatment. It’s important to note that insurance coverage often still requires that the individual provide a co-insurance payment, and some require a deductible be paid before treatment will be free. Specific plans may have different coverage levels, so it’s a good idea to check the specific policy or talk to the insurance provider. What happens in rehab?
Another example of CBT would be teaching the patient how to respond to the triggers that might once have tempted them to drink. It could be as straightforward as learning to decline an invitation to consume an alcoholic beverage. For a casual drinker, this is not an issue at all; for someone who had an intense psychological desire to drink, saying “no” can seem like the hardest challenge in the world, but that is how CBT can help turn a recovering addict’s life around.
Alcohol addiction treatment at Priory is delivered as part of a comprehensive Addiction Treatment Programme. Our Addiction Treatment Programmes typically last for 28 days, and consist of you staying at one of our nationwide hospital sites on a residential basis, for the duration of this time. During treatment, you will have the opportunity to undergo a medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process if this is required, before undergoing intensive individual and group addiction therapy in order to address the source of your addictive behaviours, increase your self-awareness and take steps towards recovery. Whilst 28 days is the recommended treatment time for alcohol addiction, treatment lengths at Priory can be flexible according to your unique needs, requirements and commitments. How to Quit Drugs Without Rehab - Are Drug Addiction Rehab Facilities Even Effective Long Term?
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