Denial is common among those suffering with alcoholism. Your loved ones may have tried to discuss the problem with you, but you were unable to see things as clearly as them. Denial is one of the body’s defence mechanisms and is employed by the brain to protect you from a harsh reality. It can be useful for a short period but if it continues, can end up causing harm.
Alcohol addiction, also known as ‘alcoholism’ or ‘alcohol use disorder’, is a condition that is characterised by drinking alcohol in excess, to the extent that your body eventually becomes dependent on alcohol in order to function on a day-to-day basis. Whilst enjoying the occasional alcoholic drink can, for many people, be a harmless pleasure, it is when alcohol consumption becomes more frequent that it can result in the development of a harmful addiction.
Many rehab patients continue to receive treatment for their addictions after leaving rehab. They may have regular clinic visits with a doctor to manage physical symptoms. Patients may also meet with a counselor on a regular, outpatient basis to refine coping skills. In addition to the love and support of family and friends, patients may also attend support group meetings after leaving a drug rehab treatment facility. All of these aftercare services help patients remain drug free and avoid relapse.
Quality of life improvement. Drug rehab is about helping the patient learn how to avoid relapse on an ongoing basis, but it should also be about helping patients to improve their daily experience. This happens when they are given the assistance they need to handle the other issues in their life that may be diminishing their ability to remain clean and sober. Health problems, legal issues, family problems – all these and more should be addressed on an as-needed basis at an effective addiction treatment program. Best Drug Rehab Music Room
No matter where you are in your recovery, there is an addiction treatment center that can help you. For those just starting out and in need of medical treatment, alcohol detox may be the most appropriate. For those who have safely surmounted the challenge of acute alcohol withdrawal and have already made progress with the physical dependence associated with alcoholism, ongoing inpatient or outpatient alcohol rehab that offers therapy can help further the recovery journey.
As a person continues to use drugs, the brain adapts by reducing the ability of cells in the reward circuit to respond to it. This reduces the high that the person feels compared to the high they felt when first taking the drug—an effect known as tolerance. They might take more of the drug to try and achieve the same high. These brain adaptations often lead to the person becoming less and less able to derive pleasure from other things they once enjoyed, like food, sex, or social activities.
Certain opioid medications such as methadone and more recently buprenorphine (In America, "Subutex" and "Suboxone") are widely used to treat addiction and dependence on other opioids such as heroin, morphine or oxycodone. Methadone and buprenorphine are maintenance therapies intended to reduce cravings for opiates, thereby reducing illegal drug use, and the risks associated with it, such as disease, arrest, incarceration, and death, in line with the philosophy of harm reduction. Both drugs may be used as maintenance medications (taken for an indefinite period of time), or used as detoxification aids.[9] All available studies collected in the 2005 Australian National Evaluation of Pharmacotherapies for Opioid Dependence suggest that maintenance treatment is preferable,[9] with very high rates (79–100%)[9] of relapse within three months of detoxification from LAAM, buprenorphine, and methadone.[9][10]
Any drug overdose can be either accidental or intentional. Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50. Accidental overdoses tend to happen when people take more of a prescription medication than originally intended to achieve certain results, or when they use too much of an illegal drug trying to get a better high. Intentional overdoses are usually a result of someone trying to commit suicide. Regardless of the intent, any loss of life due to an overdose is tragic and any overdose can have severe and lasting repercussions.

Behavioral Health of the Palm Beaches (BHPB) is a comprehensive treatment center that provides mental health and trauma programs in addition to their reputable addiction program. BHPB was founded in 1997 by Dr. Donald Mullaney, a recovering addict. BHPB has some of the most talented treatment professionals in the nation who help outline specialized treatment plans for each patient. Treatment lasts a minimum of 30 days, but long-term care lasting up to 12 months is available.
Cost may be a factor when selecting a treatment approach. Evaluate the coverage in your health insurance plan to determine how much of the costs your insurance will cover and how much you will have to pay. Ask different programs if they offer sliding scale fees — some programs may offer lower prices or payment plans for individuals without health insurance.

No matter where you are in your recovery, there is an addiction treatment center that can help you. For those just starting out and in need of medical treatment, alcohol detox may be the most appropriate. For those who have safely surmounted the challenge of acute alcohol withdrawal and have already made progress with the physical dependence associated with alcoholism, ongoing inpatient or outpatient alcohol rehab that offers therapy can help further the recovery journey.
Remember though, overcoming alcoholism is a process. Less than half of individuals relapse after achieving one year of sobriety. That number reduces to less than 15 percent who relapse after five years of sobriety. For the greatest chance of long-term sobriety after completing an inpatient or outpatient program, you should participate in local support groups and continue with counseling. Treating alcoholism is an investment in your future. It will not only make a huge difference in your life, but also the lives of those around you such as family members and friends.
Initiate a one-on-one conversation. If you don’t bring up the topic of drug addiction, it’s unlikely that your loved one will initiate the discussion. Denial is one of the strongest side effects of addiction, and it’s all too easy for spouses, partners, or children to ignore the problem along with the addict. Have an honest, heart-to-heart talk with your loved one about how their behavior is affecting you and other people in your home.
Outpatient treatment programs give you the flexibility to continue to live at home and work or attend school while participating in a program. There are varying levels of outpatient treatment depending on the level of care the patient needs. Some outpatient programs may involve several hours of therapy per day while others might require varying amounts of time throughout the week.5  Program requirements vary, and you can research the various programs to find what works best for you.
Each state has category defined statutes; for example, there are low-income seniors, parents enrolled in Medicaid of low-income children, pregnant woman, and low-income children of a particular age. Persons with disabilities fall into certain categories as well, if they receive supplemental security income and have no work history they are enrolled in Medicaid to ensure they have health coverage. A person must prove they have a disability, such as blindness, deafness, mental illness, or a physical disability that prevents them from working.

According to SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 22.5 million people (8.5 percent of the U.S. population) aged 12 or older needed treatment for an illicit* drug or alcohol use problem in 2014. Only 4.2 million (18.5 percent of those who needed treatment) received any substance use treatment in the same year. Of these, about 2.6 million people received treatment at specialty treatment programs (CBHSQ, 2015).
For people living in poverty and those who are unemployed, even homeless, and struggling with the physical, emotional, and financial cost of addiction, the idea of entering a treatment program seems impossible because there is simply no money available. Because many treatment programs are beyond the ability of these individuals or their families to afford, some of them attempt a potentially dangerous cold-turkey or at-home detox, or other treatment methods that are not evidence-based. Some of these individuals, even though they want to move past their addictions, give up on the idea of rehab altogether simply based on the inability to pay.
The Recovery Village offers inpatient depression treatment (residential rehab for depression) alongside inpatient substance abuse treatment. Inpatient depression treatment may involve antidepressant medication, various forms of therapy (including yoga and art), counseling and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). CBT is a treatment process that involves changing thought processes to change behavior. This therapy allows individuals to reverse false self-beliefs that can lead to negative moods and behaviors. CBT is also used with substance use disorder treatment, even if no co-occurring disorder is present.

Use caution with prescription drugs. If you were addicted to a prescription drug, such as an opioid painkiller, you may need to talk to your doctor about finding alternate ways to manage pain. Regardless of the drug you experienced problems with, it’s important to stay away from prescription drugs with the potential for abuse or use only when necessary and with extreme caution. Drugs with a high abuse potential include painkillers, sleeping pills, and anti-anxiety medication.

Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
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